sosuperawesome:

Book sculpture by Malena Valcarcel

(Source: sosuperawesome)

theeraserhead:

Fight Club Trivia: Author Chuck Palahniuk first came up with the idea for the novel after being beaten up on a camping trip when he complained to some nearby campers about the noise of their radio. When he returned to work, he was fascinated to find that nobody would mention or acknowledge his injuries, instead saying such commonplace things as “How was your weekend?” Palahniuk concluded that the reason people reacted this way was because if they asked him what had happened, a degree of personal interaction would be necessary, and his workmates simply didn’t care enough to connect with him on a personal level. It was his fascination with this societal ‘blocking’ which became the foundation for the novel.

theeraserhead:

Fight Club Trivia: Author Chuck Palahniuk first came up with the idea for the novel after being beaten up on a camping trip when he complained to some nearby campers about the noise of their radio. When he returned to work, he was fascinated to find that nobody would mention or acknowledge his injuries, instead saying such commonplace things as “How was your weekend?” Palahniuk concluded that the reason people reacted this way was because if they asked him what had happened, a degree of personal interaction would be necessary, and his workmates simply didn’t care enough to connect with him on a personal level. It was his fascination with this societal ‘blocking’ which became the foundation for the novel.

(Source: gowniak2)

theparisreview:

“We know: it’s hard to leave home. Your showerhead gets great water pressure; the guy at your bodega saves you the last copy of the Post; the coffee people remember your name. Why skip town? Indeed, we’re so irredeemably tethered to Manhattan that we haven’t bothered to have a foreign office in forty years. And we’re The Paris Review.”
Inspired by our subscription deal with McSweeney’s, our second New Year’s resolution: travel more.

theparisreview:

“We know: it’s hard to leave home. Your showerhead gets great water pressure; the guy at your bodega saves you the last copy of the Post; the coffee people remember your name. Why skip town? Indeed, we’re so irredeemably tethered to Manhattan that we haven’t bothered to have a foreign office in forty years. And we’re The Paris Review.”

Inspired by our subscription deal with McSweeney’s, our second New Year’s resolution: travel more.

explore-blog:

Prologue – teas inspired by literary classics. To be brewed according to George Orwell’s 11 golden rules for the perfect cup of tea and sipped alongside snacks from The Artists’ and Writers’ Cookbook.

(Source: explore-blog)

I need to write a poem for 6:00p.m. tonight and I’ve drank a lot of tea and I really have to pee and I have to re-read LeGuin’s The Left Hand of Darkness for my sci-fi class which I may not do since I’ve read it at least 15 times. Or something. I love that book. I put it in my bag today and held it like it was a holy relic.

I have a lot of feelings about words.

cumberbauched:

theangelsfellfromtrenzalore:

dramasbomin:

a-geek-without-braces:

I did it. I found the ultimate tumblr bookstore.

why was green eggs and ham banned??

THAT  is a really good question

it was banned in china from 65-91 for its portrayal of early marxism 

victoriousvocabulary:

FLORILEGIUM

[noun]

1. a collection of excerpts from written texts, especially works of literature; an anthology of short literary pieces and poems and ballads etc.

2. an anthology of good writing from the best writers for imitation.

3. a lavishly illustrated book on flowers.

Etymology: Modern Latin, from Latin florilegus (flower-collecting), from flōs (flower) + legere (to collect).

[Valentin Rekunenko]

fer1972:

The Incredible Miniature Libraries of